9 Foods That Can Improve the Immune System

A healthy diet can combat the disease. It takes more than an apple a day to keep away from doctors. Apparently, eating some nutrients enough to help keep the immune system against viruses and harmful bacteria.

As reported by prevention.com, the following materials can add extra strength to fight the flu in winter.

1. Yogurt

Probiotics in yogurt are healthy bacteria that keep the intestines and digestive tract free of disease-causing germs.

Though already available in supplement form, a study from the University of Vienna in Austria found that 7 ounces of yogurt each day is as effective as an immune tonic.

In a Swedish study of 181 factory employees, those who take daily supplements of Lactobacillus reuteri (special probiotic that works to stimulate white blood cells) have a number of 33% fewer sick days than those given placebos.

Optimal dose: Two 6-ounce servings per day.

2. Wheat and barley

According to reports a study in Norway, these grains contain beta-glucan, a type of fiber with antimicrobial and antioxidant capabilities more potent than echinacea.

When animals eat this compound, they tend to be less frequently attacked by influenza, herpes, even anthrax. In humans, the benefits can enhance immunity, memeprcepat wound healing, and help antibiotics work better.

Optimal dose: At least one of three daily servings of grains.

3. Garlic

Garlic contains allicin, the active ingredient that fights infection and bacteria.

British researchers gave 146 people a placebo or a garlic extract for 12 weeks. The result, participants who ate garlic two-thirds less likely to get the flu.

Other studies have shown that people who chew garlic more than six cloves a week have a colorectal cancer rate 30% lower rate of stomach cancer and 50% lower.

Optimal dose: Two raw cloves a day and add crushed garlic in cooking for a couple of times a week.

4. Fish

Selenium is contained in shellfish, lobster, and crabs. Its function is to help white blood cells produce proteins that help cytokine flu virus out of the body.

Salmon, mackerel, and herring rich in omega-3 fats that bergyuna reduce inflammation, increase air flow, and protect the lungs from colds and respiratory infections.

Optimal dose: Two servings a week (unless it is or planning to become pregnant).

5. Chicken soup

Researchers from the University of Nebraska found that chicken-flavored ramen noodle block the migration of the inflammation caused by white blood cells.

This finding is important because cold symptoms respond to the accumulation of cells in the bronchial tubes. Cysteine ​​amino acid is produced from chicken during the cooking process. These chemicals resembles the bronchitis drug acetylcysteine.

If the added spices such as garlic and onions, may boost immunity.

Optimal dose: One bowl when feeling tired.

6. Tea

A Harvard study found that people who drank five cups of black tea a day for 2 weeks has the ability to fight 10 times as much virus in their blood than other people who drank a placebo beverage.

L-theanine, an amino acid that is responsible boost immunity, much abundant in black tea and green tea either.

Optimal dose: A few cups a day.

7. Beef

Zinc deficiency is one of the most common nutritional deficiency in American adults, especially for vegetarians and people who have reduced portions of beef, the main source of minerals that strengthen immunity.

Mild zinc deficiency in its early stages it can increase the risk of infection. Zinc in the diet is essential for the development of white blood cells, cells of the immune system that functions to recognize and destroy bacteria, viruses, and various other substances.

Optimal dose: 3 ounces of lean beef provides about 30 percent of the Daily Value of zinc. If you do not like beef, can try oysters, fortified cereals, pork, poultry, yogurt, or milk.

8. Sweet Potato

Sweet potato serves as first-line fortress against bacteria and viruses that do not want.

To stay strong and healthy, skin needs vitamin A. Vitamin A plays a major role in the production of connective tissue, a key component of the skin.

One of the best ways to get vitamin A in the diet is from foods containing beta-carotene (such as sweet potatoes) are converted by the body into vitamin A.

Optimal dose: One-half cup serving provides only 170 calories but 40 percent daily value of beta carotene. Other foods rich in beta-carotene: carrots, pumpkin, canned pumpkin, and melons.

9. Mushrooms

For centuries, people around the world have made use of mushrooms for a healthy immune system.

Research has shown that mushrooms increase the production and activity of white blood cells, making them more aggressive. This is good when the body is exposed to infection.

Optimal dose: shiitake, maitake, and reishi mushrooms appear to be most beneficial for the immune system. Experts recommend at least 1 / 4 ounce to an ounce a few times a day.